What You Can Do About the Flu

It’s already time to start preparing for the flu season. Don’t delay, get your flu shot today!

A young person in Florida has already died from the flu, and another woman in Kentucky passed away in mid-October from flu-related illness. These aren’t cold weather states; the flu is already starting this year and will be pervasive in the Panhandle before we know it.

Last year marked the highest level of hospitalization for influenza ever recorded. After such a staggering season, the CDC looked back at 2017 to report on the direct costs – such as doctor’s visits and hospital stays as a result of the flu. The annual cost for treating influenza in the United States in 2017 was $4.6 billion.

You Can Make 2018 a Better Flu Season

There are some positive signs for this flu season. The CDC forecasts the H3N2 influenza virus to have a weaker year than 2017 since, unfortunately, so many people were infected with that particular strain last year. Also, Australia’s recent flu cases (their flu season peaks around our Labor Day) were primarily of the H1N1 strain, which is milder than other strains. We are all hopeful this trend will continue.

Signals of a milder flu strain shouldn’t mean it is time to relax against the disease. Last year, 80,000 Americans died from the flu – most of them over the age of 65. If you are a senior citizen, or come into contact with seniors – at church, in restaurants or theaters, or over the holidays – the flu can be deadly. Everyone should get a flu shot, but especially if you are in contact with Amarillo’s more vulnerable citizens.

Flu shots are still the single most effective way to prevent infection and to stay healthy.

From the time a person is exposed to the flu virus, to the time when symptoms begin is an average of about 2 days. Even so, symptoms may begin as early as the very next day or may not appear for as many as 4 days. At that time, most adults are able to infect others from the day before their symptoms develop, up to 5 to 7 days after becoming ill.

The lengthy and unclear time of being contagious is why many people infect others. They may not “feel sick” and still be contagious. Or they may feel they’ve already beaten the disease after their own illness – and may yet still be contagious to others who haven’t been vaccinated. A flu shot is not only the best way to keep yourself healthy, it is the best way you can keep from infecting others.

5 Tips to Combat Flu Season

  1. If you have flu-like symptoms you should always separate yourself from others and go to bed. A good rule of thumb is to assume that you are contagious for 24 hours after your fever goes away. Stay away from others until that time period has passed.

    2. Wash your hands often with soap and water. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers and don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth. If you do, wash your hands again.

    3. We’ve all been told to cover our coughs and sneezes. Since a sneeze travels at speeds of 100 miles per hour, they need to be covered. Grab a tissue and use them. And wash your hands.

    4. Clean surfaces and items that have frequent hand contact with anti-bacterial cleaner or wipes.

    5. Get enough sleep. Proper sleep helps keep bodies running at their best, and helps recovery happen quicker. At any stage of the disease, and before infection, sleep is one of the best things you can do to remain healthy.

We are here to care for you! Contact BSA ADC today for a flu shot.

If You Do Become Ill…

We hope that you don’t, but if you do, it’s okay – we can still help you. Prescription antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high risk factors, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick. Starting medication treatments later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health or is very sick from the flu.

Follow your doctor’s instructions when taking any prescription medication.

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