Having Trouble Sleeping? Hit the Gym!

Photo by bruce mars on Unsplash

Try adding exercise to your daily routine to enjoy better sleep.

Do you toss and turn? Do you wake up after a few hours and find it impossible to fall back asleep? First, the bad news: so are 60 million other Americans. 60 million Americans will experience some form of insomnia this year.

The Good News

Sleep disorders are treatable, and you can find help at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic Sleep Disorders Center. The center specializes in the diagnoses and treatment of patients who have sleep difficulties.

There may be personal changes that can also help that don’t require a physician. Putting your smartphone away an hour before bedtime helps your mind and body “power down.” Caffeine stays in your body for 6 – 8 hours after drinking a cup of joe, and your liver needs an hour to break down alcohol. So try having your beverage of choice earlier in the day.

Researchers have found sleep quality improves with exercise.

If you’ve been tossing and turning for twenty minutes, you often become anxious about not falling asleep. Getting out of bed and distracting yourself for a few minutes can help – reading, watching a relaxing show, meditating. But one study shows “a bout of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (e.g., walking) reduced the time it took to fall asleep and increased the length of sleep of people with chronic insomnia compared to a night in which they did not exercise.”

People who regularly hit the gym sleep better and feel more alert during the day than those who are not as active. An Oregon State University sleep study showed that participants who exercised 150 minutes a week slept better and felt less drowsy during the daytime.

Regular physical activity may help those suffering from insomnia without medication.

Why Does Exercise Help?

Oddly, not all exercise seems to assist in battling insomnia. Running, lifting weights and other vigorous aerobic exercise does not immediately improve sleep. After a period of daily exercise, (a few months) adults following vigorous workout routines reported better sleep quality. They reported falling asleep more quickly than they did before starting their exercise regimen, and also sleeping for longer periods of time.

Exercise causes the body to elevate its temperature. This increase in body temperature can last for up to four hours after your workout. The post-exercise drop in temperature promotes falling asleep, so get that workout in before dinner. After that, a little light yoga or an after-dinner stroll is helpful – but don’t take a late HIIT workout.

If you don’t have problems falling asleep, but you wake up after a few hours, a morning jog may be the most beneficial. Beginning the day with exercise will help the body remain in its rested state longer. Make sure that you stretch and warm up if you go this route – your body needs time to adjust from sleep to activity.

Exercise Helps in Other Ways

Insomnia is often linked to depression and anxiety, ranging from mild to severe cases. The release of endorphins as a result of exercise plays a large part in reducing those symptoms.

Circadian rhythm also plays a part in some types of insomnia, and exercise can help to “reset” that natural cycle. Adding exercise early in the day sets the body cycle naturally to rest after a period of time. If your body clock is broken, a quick exercise regimen may be just the thing you need to fix it.

Beyond Exercise

If you have difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep at night or excessive daytime sleepiness, we are here for you. If it seems like nothing works, don’t worry. We have you covered – read this, and learn more about our Sleep Disorders Center here.

Advertisements

Diabetes: Sugar vs. You

Sugar

Diabetes is a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there are high levels of sugar in the blood. The latest statistics released in 2011 show that 25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—have diabetes. Yearly, diabetes contributes to over 200,000 deaths. These statistics are daunting, but diabetes can be kept under control. At the Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, we know that by being active, eating healthy, and keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol under control, you can prevent diabetes problems.  There are many publications and information out there regarding diabetes, but the general public can be confused on certain aspects of diabetes, specifically the largest culprit of diabetes problems, sugar.

Let’s pull back the curtain on the sugar myths and exaggerations and learn what you or someone you know suffering from diabetes can do to keep glucose levels in check.

From Men’s Health | by Mike Zimmerman

Sugar Doesn’t Cause Diabetes

Too much sugar does. Diabetes means your body can’t clear glucose from your blood. And when glucose isn’t processed quickly enough, it destroys tissue, Levitsky says. People with type 1 diabetes were born that way—sugar didn’t cause their diabetes. But weight gain in children and adults can cause metabolic syndrome, which leads to type 2 diabetes.

“That’s what diabetes is all about—being unable to eliminate glucose,” says Levitsky. “The negative effect of eating a lot of sugar is a rise in glucose. A normal pancreas and normal insulin receptors can handle it, clear it out, or store it in some packaged form, like fat.”

What matters: That “normal” pancreas. Overeating forces your pancreas to work overtime cranking out insulin to clear glucose. Eric Westman, M.D., an obesity researcher at the Duke University medical center, says that in today’s world, “it’s certainly possible that the unprecedented increase in sugar and starch consumption leads to pancreatic burnout.” But researchers can’t be sure; everyone’s body and diet are different, so generalization is iffy. One thing that is sure, Dr. Westman says, is that the rise in sugar consumption over the past 100 years is unprecedented.

Your job: Drop the pounds if you’re overweight, and watch your sugar intake. Research has shown for years that dropping 5 percent to 7 percent of your body weight can reduce your odds of developing diabetes.

Sugar and High-Fructose Corn Syrup

Simply Avoiding High-Fructose Corn Syrup Won’t Save You from Obesity
In the 1970s and 1980s, the average American’s body weight increased in tandem with the food industry’s use of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a staple because it’s cheap. But it’s not a smoking gun. “This is a correlation, not a causation,” says Levitsky.

“Obesity is about consuming too many calories,” says Lillian Lien, M.D., the medical director of inpatient diabetes management at the Duke University medical center. “It just so happens that a lot of overweight people have been drinking HFCS in sodas and eating foods that are high on the glycemic index—sweet snacks, white bread, and so forth. The calorie totals are huge, and the source just happens to be sugar-based.”

Dr. Westman notes that the effect of a high-glycemic food can be lessened by adding fat and protein. Spreading peanut butter (protein and fat) on a bagel (starch, which becomes glucose in your body), for example, slows your body’s absorption of the sugar.

What matters: We can demonize food manufacturers because they produce crap with enough salt and sugar to make us eat more of it than we should—or even want to. But it comes down to how much we allow down our throats. “A practical guide for anyone is weight,” says Dr. Lien. “If your weight is under control, then your calorie intake across the board is reasonable. If your weight rises, it’s not. That’s more important than paying attention to any specific macronutrient.” Still, skinny isn’t always safe. (Keep reading.)

Sugar and Fat

Too Much Sugar Fills Your Blood with Fat

Click here to read the rest of the article.

– – –

Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic treats a variety of adult illnesses ranging from acute colds and flu to more serious conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and cardiac diseases. Click here to see a list of medical specialties that Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic offers.