ADC’s Dr. Sean Milligan (Neurology) Named Partner In MS Care

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society designated Dr. Sean Milligan, Neurologist, Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A. as Partner In MS Care

Congratulations Dr. Milligan!

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New Pap Smear Guidelines (Feat. Dr. Joanna Wilson)

Interview Dr. Joanna Wilson, ADC | KFDA, News Channel 10, Amarillo

Interview Dr. Joanna Wilson, ADC | KFDA, News Channel 10, Amarillo

Joanna Wilson, D. O. Internal Medicine specializing in Women's Health

Joanna Wilson, D. O.
Internal Medicine specializing in Women’s Health

Annual exams are now not really annual. The recommendations for Pap Smears have changed.

It’s recommended now that Pap Smear screening should start at age 21 and for most women, they can stop screening at age 65.

The reason for this is because the quality of Pap Smear screening has improved so much. No longer are we taking samples and smearing them on a slide to examine them. Now, they can take all the cells and examine them thoroughly with more sensitivity. Therefore, we can know that exams don’t have to be annual since the samples are quality. The samples are much better quality now then they once were.

The ability to reduce screening while increasing sensitivity is a unique thing in this day and age. It means you don’t have to be anxious about getting a Pap Smear once a year. For people who aren’t comfortable skipping their annual exam, by all means go to the annual exam to learn the other things you need such as blood pressure, weight and other things.

But the quality of the samples are so good now, and since we know so much more about the human papillomavirus – how it changes the cells an  what the timeline is  – we can, with very good science, say that screening every 3 years without the HPV add-on, or we can screen every 5 years with that test. We’re in good hands.

To learn more, visit http://www.ADPCA.com

Why see a Rheumatology Specialist? (Featuring Dr. Ming Chen, ADC, Rheumatologist)

What is Rheumatology?

Rheumatology is the area of medical expertise concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the muscles, bones and joints. It can include knee pain, hip pain, back pain and more.

In this video, watch Dr. Schwartzenburg give an overview to a real patient about Rheumatology.

Inside Look: Rheumatology with Dr. Schwartzenburg

Rheumatology Treatment Options

Rheumatology Treatment Options Part 2

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Specialist Bio

Rheumatology

Dr. Ming Chen, Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A. Specialist, Rheumatology

Dr. Ming Chen, Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A. Specialist, Rheumatology

Dr. Ming Chen

Call Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic to schedule an appointment with Dr. Ming Chen at 8063580200

Video: How To Effectively Treat Headaches

From The Headache Center at ADC

Featuring Tiffany Ferrell RN, MSN, FNPC

Could Hearing Loss and Dementia Be Connected?

From a New York Times Health Interview

Interview by 

Published: February 11, 2013
Pam Belluck is a health and science writer for The New York Times.

Pam Belluck is a health and science writer for The New York Times.

PAM BELLUCK: I’m Pam Belluck, I’m a health and science writer for The New York Times. And this week, I am interviewing Katherine Bouton, who has been a long time editor for The New York Times and it now a contributing writer to our science section. And she has written a book called, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You.” And it’s a look into her own personal journey with hearing loss and a look into the research behind hearing loss. Katherine has written a piece that looks at a very interesting and surprising connection that some scientists have found between hearing loss and dementia. Katherine, first of all, welcome to the podcast, thank you for joining us.

KATHERINE BOUTON: Thank you very much.

MS. BELLUCK: And why don’t you tell us a little bit about what the scientists have found here.

MS. BOUTON: In studies over about the past…beginning in 2011 and continuing now—a new study was just published last month—is that there seems to be a strong association between hearing loss and both the earlier onset and more serious degree of dementia even with milder hearing loss, but especially with very severe hearing loss. For somebody like me who has a hearing aid and a cochlear implant but I still don’t hear very , this is alarming news.

MS. BELLUCK: All they have found at the moment is what’s called an association. So we don’t have any kind of causal connection—either that dementia either causing hearing loss or vice versa. But they do have three interesting theories about what could be happening. Could you lay those out for us?

MS. BOUTON: Okay, I should mention that the primary researcher on this is Frank Lin, who is at Hopkins and his database are two or three different long-term epidemiological studies. The first was based on the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. I went to see him after that first study was published and he had three things to offer.

The first made a lot of sense. It was that people with hearing loss tend to isolate themselves and isolation is a risk factor for dementia whether you’re hearing or hearing-impaired.

The second is something that he calls cognitive load — and which I call cognitive overload. What happens is that when you aren’t hearing very well, even with corrected hearing you’re trying so hard to hear the person that it makes it very hard to actually listen to what the person is saying. It’s very hard to absorb the information. When I did my interviews for this book – and I did a lot — I taped all of my interviews and I had someone else transcribe them because I couldn’t hear the tapes. I went and I got my transcriptions back I was constantly surprised by what I had asked, what I had heard, what they had answered. Every interview was like doing the whole thing fresh twice over.

The third possible explanation is the one that is most alarming and it’s the one that scientists like Dr. Lin and others are beginning to look at, and that’s that there’s an underlying pathological mechanism that has an influence on both hearing loss and dementia. It could be something environmental. It could be something genetic. They just don’t know.

These studies so far have relied on self-reported use of hearing aids. The next study that Dr. Lin is doing — he’s submitted a grant application now — is to specifically study how hearings aids are used, how often they are used, how carefully they were fitted, how much continual contact with the audiologist there is, whether the hearing-impaired person uses any assistive technology in addition to the hearing aids or the cochlear implant.

MS. BELLUCK: I’m interested in what you’re saying about corrected hearing. You are somebody wearing a hearing aid and a cochlear implant and according to the research that would not necessarily make a difference here. According to his research so far, people who are wearing hearing aids — it didn’t protect them from getting dementia. So does that tend to suggest some support for this idea that there being this underlying biological mechanism that might cause both?

READ THE FULL STORY…

A Conversation with Dr. Douglas Lewis

Douglas Lewis, D.O.

 Dr. Lewis has joined the Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic staff recently, adding experience to the group in the field of Neurology as well as his warm and comfortable personality. We sat down with him to talk about the move.

Here’s what he said:

Where did you practice before coming to ADC?

I was in private practice just up the street on 9th. It was a successful solo practice. I had a lot of wonderful patients. And now, I’m happy to continue their care at ADC.

Dynamics are different coming from a clinic. How has that been?

Dynamics are different. One of the reasons I decided to join the group was the other physicians along with the quality of care at this facility. It is a great group for sure.

We love Dr. Milligan. Because you are both Neurologists, are you looking forward to working with him? One thing about Dr. Milligan is his dry sense of humor…

Yes. He’s dryer than I am, I suspect. He’s great. A good guy.

How many years were you in private practice?

I was in private practice for eight years.

Where are you from?

I’m from Colorado Springs and attended high school there.

Where did you receive medical training?

I went to medical school at Des Moines University in Iowa. I did an internship in New Jersey and then my Neurology internship in Detroit where I also did a fellowship in Neuro-Physiology.  Once I finished my medical education, I came here and worked with a large physician group for about six years. After that, I went into private practice where I remained for the next eight years.  I’ve been in practice for about 14 years.  The years go by fast.

Do you visit Colorado often?

Yes, I do. I’m actually going in the near future. My high school buddies and I still get together every year and go camping for a weekend.

Where do you like to go?

We go all over. This year we’re going up near Steamboat, a long trip for me. But, it fits in okay.

Do you have family?

Yes. My wife is from the Amarillo region. I have two sons at home and a daughter who is currently attending Optometry School.

What are some hobbies you enjoy other than camping?

We like to ski, snowmobile, and other Winter activities.  We also enjoy water skiing in the Summer.

If you were opening up a keynote in front of millions of people, what’s something interesting you’d say?

Now, that would be hard. I am opening up a keynote this weekend at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. I am a diabetic and have been on the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation board for the last couple years. I am opening up the walk this weekend.  I don’t know what I will say but I am sure it will come to me before then.

Being a doctor, you are the source of information everyday, it’s a totally different mindset. What’s that like?

Sure. It’s been about everything I expected it to be. I like it.

Inside Look: Rheumatology with Dr. Schwartzenburg

 

Watch more videos on the ADC YouTube Channel – ADC YouTube

Common Questions (ADC)

Where is Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic located?

Our physical address is 6700 West 9th. We are located at the intersection of West 9th and Quail Creek.

Will Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic accept my insurance?

The physicians at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic do participate in and accept most insurance plans. There may be some tests or services that your physician orders which are not covered by your insurance. In this instance, ADC’s staff will do their best to notify you in advance of the test or service being performed. We highly recommend you contact your insurance company and be up-to-date on your coverage plan. We too, are concerned over the rising cost of health care; and in an effort to assist you, we will file insurance claims on your behalf. However, you will be expected to pay any co-pay or deductible amounts at the time services are performed.

Is a referral needed to see a physician at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic?

Some insurance plans do not require a patient to obtain a referral from their primary care physician for certain procedures; however, others do. You should check with your insurance company or the Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic appointment staff to see if a referral is needed. It is the responsibility of the patient to obtain all necessary referrals.

Can I call and speak directly with my doctor?

It is not always feasible to speak directly to your physician when you call the Clinic. Your call is very important to us and will be returned by your physician’s nurse as soon as possible.

Why did it take so long for my return my phone call?

It is very important that your doctor’s nurse have all of the information necessary to return your phone call. This information could be lab results, X-ray and/or other diagnostic test results and your patient records. It takes a reasonable amount of time for this information to be gathered properly in order to better serve you or your family member.

If I have an emergency, what should I do?

In an emergency, you should go to the emergency room in order that immediate care can be delivered. Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic is not an emergency treatment facility, and you should never come to Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic for urgent or emergency care. At your request, your Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic physician will be notified of your condition and reason for emergency care by the emergency room staff.

How long will I be at the Clinic?

At Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, we have the ability to provide an extensive variety of services all under one roof. To better serve you or your family member, your physician may order tests or exams that take time to complete. The time you spend at the Clinic will depend upon the test that your physician has ordered for you.

More Common Questions

Neurology Study: One Week of Therapy May Help Reorganize Brain, Reduce Stuttering

MINNEAPOLIS – Just one week of speech therapy may reorganize the brain, helping to reduce stuttering, according to a study published in the August 8, 2012, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The Chinese study gives researchers new insights into the role of different brain regions in stuttering, which affects about one percent of adults.

The study involved 28 people with stuttering and 13 people who did not stutter. Fifteen of the people with stuttering received a week of therapy with three sessions per day. The other stutterers and the controls received no therapy. Therapy involved the participants repeating two-syllable words that were spoken to them and then reading words presented to them visually. There was no time limit in either task. The average scores on stuttering tests and percent of stuttered syllables improved for those who received the therapy. There was no change in scores for the stutterers who did not receive therapy.

Brain scans were used to measure the thickness of the cerebral cortex in the brain for all participants at the beginning and end of the study. READ MORE:

 

Dr. Sean Milligan, Neurologist

One of the specialties at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic is Neurology. The Neurology team is lead by Dr. Sean Milligan.

An example of a disease a neurologist would treat is Carpal Tunnel and the test used is a nerve conduction study. Watch as Dr. Milligan demonstrates a nerve conduction study in this video:

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Other reasons you might need to see a neurologist are:

  • Parkinson’s Disease

  • Multiple Sclerosis

  • Dimentia

  • Neuropathy

  • Migraine Headaches

  • Epilepsy

Smells like nostalgia: Why do scents bring back memories?

By Meghan Holohan

NBCNews.com

The smell of chlorine wafts through the air. Suddenly, you recall childhood summers spent in a swimming pool. Or maybe it’s a whiff of apple pie, or the scent of the same perfume your mom used to wear. Our noses have a way of sniffing out nostalgia.

“I stepped into an elevator and a bunch of people piled in behind me. I was behind a woman with her back to me, her hair was in my nose, and I could smell the perfume, Shalimar, and I hadn’t smelled it in [years]. It seemed like I was transported back to high school,” says Howard Eichenbaum, director of the Laboratory of Cognitive Neurobiology at Boston University.

While all the senses are connected with memories, smell in particular sparks a flurry of emotional memories. Why?

After a smell enters the nose, it travels through the cranial nerve through the olfactory bulb, which helps the brain process smells. The olfactory bulb is part of the limbic system, the emotional center of the brain. As a member of the limbic system, the olfactory bulb can easily access the amygdala, which plays a role in emotional memories (it’s also where the “fight or flight” reflex comes from).

“Olfactory has a strong input into the amygdala, which process emotions. The kind of memories that it evokes are good and they are more powerful,” explains Eichenbaum.

This close relationship between the olfactory and the amygdala is one of the reason odors cause a spark of nostalgia.

“We don’t use emotional memory that much,” says Dr. Ron DeVere, director of the Taste and Smell Disorders Clinic and the Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders Center, in Austin, Texas, and member of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). He adds that when people consciously attempt to remember something they focus on the details, not feelings.

“You have an odor, you may not identify the odor, but you are associating that with some memories. The first time you smelled apple pie you may have been at your grandmother’s house,” DeVere says.

Also at play is a relationship between the olfactory system and the hippocampus, which is critical to developing memories. Even though the olfactory system interacts with the emotion and memory centers in the brain, it does not connect with more developed regions.

“Smells do bring back memories,” says Dr. Ken Heilman, James E. Rooks Jr. Distinguished Professor Neurology and Health Psychology at the University of Florida and a member of AAN.

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