ADC Endoscopy Specialists Achieves AAAHC Accreditation

ADC Endoscopy Specialists

Amarillo, TX – 2014 – ADC Endoscopy Specialists has achieved accreditation by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). Accreditation distinguishes this ambulatory surgical center from many other outpatient facilities by providing the highest quality of care to its patients as determined by an independent, external process of evaluation.

Status as an accredited organization means ADC Endoscopy Specialists has met nationally recognized standards for the provision of quality health care set by AAAHC. More than 5,000 ambulatory health care organizations across the United States are accredited by AAAHC. Not all ambulatory health care organizations seek accreditation; not all that undergo the rigorous on-site survey process are granted accreditation.

“At ADC Endoscopy Specialists we always strive for quality patient care,” stated Christi Adams, Director of Clinical Services for ADC Endoscopy Specialists. “When you see our certificate of accreditation, you will know that AAAHC, an independent, not-for-profit organization, has closely examined our facility and our procedures. To be granted accreditation means that we as an organization care enough about our patients to strive for the highest level of care possible.”

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Ambulatory health care organizations seeking accreditation by AAAHC undergo an extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, presenting best practices to help an organization improve its care and services.

“Going through the process of accreditation challenges us to find ways to better serve our patients, and it is a constant reminder that our responsibility is to strive to continuously improve the quality of care that we provide,” said Adams.
ADC Endoscopy Specialists was formed on March24, 2006, with the intention of providing quality care with comfort and convenience to their patients. The ownership of the facility is a joint venture between BSA Holdings, Inc. and five gastroenterologists, Dr. Daniel Beggs, Dr. Todd Ellington, Dr. Tom Johnson, Dr. Jake Lennard and Dr. James Lusby.

We are licensed by the Texas Department of State Health Services, certified for Medicare services and we are AAAHC accredited. ADC Endoscopy is proud to serve the population of the Amarillo medical community, as well as surrounding Texas panhandle communities and adjacent states. The medical staff of ADC Endoscopy Specialists is comprised of seven gastroenterologists including Dr. Daniel Beggs, Dr. Todd Ellington, Dr. Tom Johnson, Dr. Jake Lennard, Dr. James Lusby, Dr. Hagos Tekeste and Dr. Abdul Thannoun. All of our physicians are board certified in their specialty and are available to provide the following procedures in a convenient outpatient setting:

• Colonoscopy
• Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)
• Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

We are conveniently located in Legacy Square at #1 Care Circle Dr., Amarillo, Texas, 79124, and our phone number is (806) 353-1769. If you would like more information about our facility please contact us or view our website at http://www.adcendoscopy.com.

The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, founded in 1979, is the leader in ambulatory health care accreditation with more than 5,000 organizations accredited nationwide. AAAHC accredits a variety of organizations including, ambulatory surgery centers, office-based surgery centers, endoscopy centers, student health centers, military health care clinics, and large medical and dental practices. AAAHC serves as an advocate for the provision of high-quality health care through the development of nationally recognized standards and through its survey and accreditation programs. AAAHC accreditation is recognized as a symbol of quality by third-party payers, medical organizations, liability insurance companies, state and federal agencies and the public.

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Could Hearing Loss and Dementia Be Connected?

From a New York Times Health Interview

Interview by 

Published: February 11, 2013
Pam Belluck is a health and science writer for The New York Times.

Pam Belluck is a health and science writer for The New York Times.

PAM BELLUCK: I’m Pam Belluck, I’m a health and science writer for The New York Times. And this week, I am interviewing Katherine Bouton, who has been a long time editor for The New York Times and it now a contributing writer to our science section. And she has written a book called, “Shouting Won’t Help: Why I — and 50 Million Other Americans — Can’t Hear You.” And it’s a look into her own personal journey with hearing loss and a look into the research behind hearing loss. Katherine has written a piece that looks at a very interesting and surprising connection that some scientists have found between hearing loss and dementia. Katherine, first of all, welcome to the podcast, thank you for joining us.

KATHERINE BOUTON: Thank you very much.

MS. BELLUCK: And why don’t you tell us a little bit about what the scientists have found here.

MS. BOUTON: In studies over about the past…beginning in 2011 and continuing now—a new study was just published last month—is that there seems to be a strong association between hearing loss and both the earlier onset and more serious degree of dementia even with milder hearing loss, but especially with very severe hearing loss. For somebody like me who has a hearing aid and a cochlear implant but I still don’t hear very , this is alarming news.

MS. BELLUCK: All they have found at the moment is what’s called an association. So we don’t have any kind of causal connection—either that dementia either causing hearing loss or vice versa. But they do have three interesting theories about what could be happening. Could you lay those out for us?

MS. BOUTON: Okay, I should mention that the primary researcher on this is Frank Lin, who is at Hopkins and his database are two or three different long-term epidemiological studies. The first was based on the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. I went to see him after that first study was published and he had three things to offer.

The first made a lot of sense. It was that people with hearing loss tend to isolate themselves and isolation is a risk factor for dementia whether you’re hearing or hearing-impaired.

The second is something that he calls cognitive load — and which I call cognitive overload. What happens is that when you aren’t hearing very well, even with corrected hearing you’re trying so hard to hear the person that it makes it very hard to actually listen to what the person is saying. It’s very hard to absorb the information. When I did my interviews for this book – and I did a lot — I taped all of my interviews and I had someone else transcribe them because I couldn’t hear the tapes. I went and I got my transcriptions back I was constantly surprised by what I had asked, what I had heard, what they had answered. Every interview was like doing the whole thing fresh twice over.

The third possible explanation is the one that is most alarming and it’s the one that scientists like Dr. Lin and others are beginning to look at, and that’s that there’s an underlying pathological mechanism that has an influence on both hearing loss and dementia. It could be something environmental. It could be something genetic. They just don’t know.

These studies so far have relied on self-reported use of hearing aids. The next study that Dr. Lin is doing — he’s submitted a grant application now — is to specifically study how hearings aids are used, how often they are used, how carefully they were fitted, how much continual contact with the audiologist there is, whether the hearing-impaired person uses any assistive technology in addition to the hearing aids or the cochlear implant.

MS. BELLUCK: I’m interested in what you’re saying about corrected hearing. You are somebody wearing a hearing aid and a cochlear implant and according to the research that would not necessarily make a difference here. According to his research so far, people who are wearing hearing aids — it didn’t protect them from getting dementia. So does that tend to suggest some support for this idea that there being this underlying biological mechanism that might cause both?

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