Sleep Hygiene Rules You Actually Want To Know

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Sleep isn’t just “time out” from daily life. It is an active state important for renewing our mental and physical health each day. More than 100 million Americans of all ages, however, regularly fail to get a good night’s sleep.

At least 84 disorders of sleeping and walking lead to a lowered quality of life and reduced personal health. They endanger public safety by contributing to traffic and industrial accidents. These disorders can lead to problems falling asleep and staying asleep, difficulties staying awake or staying with a regular sleep/wake cycle, sleepwalking, bedwetting, nightmares, and other problems that interfere with sleep. Some sleep disorders can be life-threatening.

Sleep Hygiene Rules

These guidelines can be used for many different sleep disorders. They will help most people sleep better. For more specific guidelines for your particular sleep disorder, consult your healthcare professional.

  • Keep a regular time to get up in the morning, even on days off work and on weekends.
  • Go to bed only when you’re drowsy.
  • Leave your bedroom and engage in a quiet activity elsewhere if you are unable to fall asleep within 20 minutes. Do not permit yourself to fall asleep outside the bedroom. Return to bed when, and only when, you are sleepy. Repeat this process as often as necessary throughout the night.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep, sex, and times sickness.
  • Avoid napping during the daytime. If you nap, try to do so at the same time every day and for no more than 40 minutes. Mid-afternoon (no later than 3:00 pm) is best for most people.
  • Establish relaxing pre-sleep rituals such as a warm bath, light bedtime snacks, or 10 minutes of reading.
  • Exercise regularly. Do not exercise vigorously any later than 6 hours before bedtime, and do mild exercises at least 4 hours prior to bedtime.
  • Keep a regular schedule. Regular times for meals, medications, chores and other activities help keep the inner clock running smoothly.
  • Avoid large meals before bedtime. A light snack before bedtime can help you sleep soundly. A large meal before bedtime can cause difficulty sleeping.
  • Avoid drinks with caffeine within 6 hours of bedtime.
  • Do not drink alcohol when sleepy. Even a small dose of alcohol can have a potent effect when combined with tiredness.
  • Use sleeping pills carefully. Most doctors avoid prescribing sleeping pills for longer than 3 weeks.
  • Do not drink alcohol while taking sleeping pills or other medications.

Some symptoms of a sleep disorder can include:

  • Insomnia
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Morning headaches
  • Constant leg movement
  • Gasping episodes at night
  • Overweight/obesity
  • Hypertension
  • Loud snoring
  • Dry mouth, sore throat
  • Forgetfulness
  • Loss of energy

Good sleep hygiene and medications are aimed at improving the soundness of a person’s sleep. Contact us if you have any questions or to schedule and appointment.

 

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What to Expect: Sleep Study

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The National Commission on Sleep Disorders estimate that millions of Americans are needlessly suffering from undiagnosed or misdiagnosed sleep disorders. Left untreated, sleep disorders can lead to increased health risks and an overall lower quality of life. There are numerous sleep disorders from which people suffer. Some symptoms of a sleep disorder can include:

  • Insomnia
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Morning headaches
  • Constant leg movement
  • Gasping episodes at night
  • Overweight/obesity
  • Hypertension
  • Loud snoring
  • Dry mouth, sore throat
  • Forgetfulness
  • Loss of energy

The Sleep Disorders Center at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic is a comprehensive clinic supervised by a physician board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases and is a Diplomate, American Board of Sleep Medicine.

What is a Sleep Study?

A sleep study may involve the following: Polysomnogram (PSG) – a diagnostic test which monitors brain activity, breathing and leg movements which helps to evaluate sleep apnea (obstruction of air flow) or a condition known as periodic leg movements of sleep. Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) – a daytime sleep study which evaluates how fast a person falls asleep.

What to Expect?

The first step will be an initial visit with our sleep specialist who will review your medical and sleep history. You will then schedule an appointment for an overnight visit. To help determine if a sleep disorder exists, your physician will need to know what physiologic changes occur during your typical night of sleep. We do this by recording your brainwave pattern (known as the EEG) as well as your eye movements and degree of muscle tone. Using an EKG monitor, we will measure your heart rate and check for irregular heart beats during the night. Other measurements will include oxygen saturation, snoring, leg movements or jerking and respiratory effort. An intercom in the room will allow communication with the technician should you have any questions or require assistance. Studies will usually begin between 8:00pm and 9:30 pm and will conclude at about 6am. You will then follow up with your physician who will make recommendations for treatment of the disorder.

How to Prepare?

In order to feel more comfortable with your stay, feel free to bring your toiletries and usual sleepwear and if you prefer, your own pillow. (It is helpful to avoid using hair products or skin lotions on the night of the study). It is recommended that you eat a meal prior to your study and continue to take medications as prescribed (unless your physician specifies otherwise). It is also preferred that you not consume foods or beverages containing caffeine after 5pm.

Using the latest technology for diagnosing and treating sleep disorders in a comfortable and home-like atmosphere, our team of sleep professionals is dedicated to providing the highest quality of sleep for our patients. Contact us if you have any questions or to schedule and appointment.

Good Sleep – Healthy Heart

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Sleep is a time of rest for the entire body. Even the heart, which works day and night, naturally slows down during sleep. That’s why unhealthy heart function can deprive the body of restful sleep. Yet, the relationship between heart function and sleep works both ways. For instance, sleep-related breathing disorders have been shown to play a major role in causing several types of heart and blood vessel disease.

Maintaining a Healthy Heart

Many things can be done to maintain a healthy heart: eat a nutritional diet, maintain a healthy weight, exercise regularly, get regular medical check-ups, and get adequate amounts of good quality sleep. If you have any kind of heart condition, it is especially to watch signs that you may have a sleep related breathing disorder, such as OSA, which could stress your heart.

Breathing Disorders And The Heart

People with OSA are often overweight and experience loud snoring, gasping or choking episodes while sleeping, as well as trouble staying awake during the daytime. If you already have hypertension or cardiovascular disease (coronary artery disease, angina pectoris, stroke), talk with your healthcare professional about whether or not you may have a sleep and breathing disorder, such as OSA or CSA. It is also important that patients with congestive heart failure be monitored for CSA and other sleep disorders. In contrast to people with OSA, those with heart failure and CSA are commonly thin and may not snore at all. If your healthcare professional thinks that you have a sleep disorder, he or she may suggest you have a diagnostic test, called a sleep study, or refer you to a sleep medicine specialist. Sleep studies are usually done in a sleep laboratory. Small sensors called electrodes are attached to your body to measure your sleep, breathing heart rate and oxygen level. The sleep specialist will be able to determine whether you have any abnormalities in the quality of your sleep. Your healthcare professional is then given the results and the two of you can decide on the best course of treatment. Sleep disorders are treatable, and treatment can lead to a more healthy heart.

How To Sleep Well

  • Get up about the same time every day.
  • Go to bed only when sleepy.
  • Establish relaxing pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath, light bedtime snack, or 10 minutes of reading.
  • Exercise regularly. Vigorous exercise should be confined to the early part of the day, light exercise should take place at least four hours before bedtime.
  • Maintain a regular schedule.
  • Avoid caffeine within six hours of bedtime.
  • Try to nap at the same time every day; mid-afternoon is best for most people.
  • Never combine sleeping pills and alcohol.

Sleep isn’t just a “time out” from daily life. It is an active state important for renewing our mental and physical health each day. If you’re failing to get a good night’s sleep, contact us to schedule an appointment or answer any questions.

Problem Sleepiness And Adolescents

ADC - Adolescents and problem sleepiness

Sleepiness can be due to the body’s natural daily sleep-wake cycles, inadequate sleep, sleep disorders or certain drugs. Many U.S. high school and college have signs of problem sleepiness such as:

  • Difficulty getting up for school
  • Falling asleep at school
  • Struggling to stay awake while doing homework

The need for sleep may be 9 hours or more per night as a person goes through adolescence. At the same time, many teens begin to show preference for a later bed time, which may be due to a biological change. Teens tend to stay up later but have to get up early for school, resulting in their getting much less sleep than they need.

Many factors contribute to problem sleepiness in teens and young adults,but the main causes are not getting enough sleep and irregular sleep schedules. Some of the factors that influence adolescent sleep include:

  • Social activities with peers that lead to a later bedtime
  • Homework to be done in the evenings
  • Early wake-up times due to early school start times
  • Parents being less involved in setting and enforcing bedtimes
  • Employment, sports or other extracurricular activities that decrease the time available for sleep

Teens and young adults who do not get enough sleep are at risk for problems such as:

  • Automobile crashes
  • Poor performance in school and poor grades
  • Depressed moods
  • Problems with peers and adult relationships

Many adolescents have part-time jobs in addition to their classes and other activities. High school students who work more than 20 hours per week have more than 20 hours per week have more problem sleepiness and may use more caffeine nicotine and alcohol than those who work less than 20 hours per week or not at all.

Sleep – There is no substitute! 

The amount of sleep needed each night varies among people. Each person needs a particular amount of sleep in order to be fully alert throughout the day. Many people simply do not allow enough time for sleep on a regular basis. A first step may be to evaluate daily activities and sleep-wake patterns to determine how much sleep is obtained. If you are consistently getting less than 8 hours of sleep per night, more sleep may be needed. If you think you are getting enough sleep, but still feel sleepy during the day, check with your doctor to be sure your sleepiness is not due to a sleep disorder. Contact us if you have any questions or to schedule an appointment.

What To Expect When Visiting a Sleep Specialist

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According to the National Commission on Sleep Disorders, millions of Americans are needlessly suffering from undiagnosed or misdiagnosed sleep disorders. While poor sleep can have a negative effect on performance, alertness, memory, concentration and reaction times, it is also being linked to other health issues such as heart disease and depression.

Sleep disorders are a serious health concern. It is especially important for persons suffering from hypertension diabetes, obesity and heart failure to see a sleep specialist for the detection and treatment of sleep apnea as it may prevent heart attacks and strokes as well as minimize underlying symptoms of other diseases. Left untreated, sleep disorders can lead to increased health risks and an overall lower quality of life.

Symptoms of a sleep disorder can include:

  • Insomnia
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Morning headaches
  • Constant leg movement
  • Gasping episodes at night
  • Overweight/obesity
  • Hypertension
  • Loud snoring
  • Dry mouth, sore throat
  • Forgetfulness
  • Loss of energy

What To Expect?

The first step will be an initial visit with our sleep specialist who will review your medical and sleep history. You will then schedule an appointment for an overnight visit. To help determine if a sleep disorder exists, your physicians will need to know what physiologic changes occur during your typical night of sleep. We do this by recording your brainwave pattern (known as the EEG) as well as your eye movements and degree of muscle tone. Using an EKG monitor, we will measure your heart rate and check for irregular heart beats during the night. Other measurements will include oxygen saturation, snoring, leg movements or jerking and respiratory effort. An intercom in the room will allow communication with the technician should you have any questions or require assistance. Studies will usually begin between 8:00pm and 9:00pm  and will conclude at about 6am. you will then follow up with your physician who will make recommendations for treatment of the disorder.

How To Prepare

 

In order to feel more comfortable with your stay, feel free to bring your toiletries and usual sleepwear and if you prefer, your own pillow. (It is helpful to avoid using hair products or skin lotions on the night of the study). It is recommended that you eat a meal prior to your study and continue to take medications as prescribed (unless your physician specifies otherwise). It is also preferred that you not consume foods or beverages containing caffeine after 5pm.

Finally…

Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A. is a distinguished group practice of physicians specializing in internal medicine and its major subspecialties and provides a wider range of diagnostic services on site. Each of the physicians at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic has built their practices around their commitment to superior methods of diagnosis and treatment for their patients. Contact us if you have any questions or to set up an appointment.

Sleep Disorders: How to Sleep Well

pexels-photo-largeSleep isn’t just “time out” from daily life. It is an active state important for renewing our mental and physical health each day. More than 100 million Americans of all ages, however, regularly fail to get a good night’s sleep.

At least 84 disorders of sleeping and waking lead to a lowered quality of life and reduced personal heath. They endanger public safety by contributing to traffic and industrial accidents.

Sleep disorders can lead to problems falling asleep and staying asleep, difficulties staying awake or staying with regular sleep/wake cycle, sleepwalking, bedwetting, nightmares, and other problems that interfere with sleep. Some sleep disorders can be life-threatening.

Sleep disorders are diagnosed and treated by many different healthcare professionals, including general practitioners and specialist in neurology, pulmonary medicine, psychiatry, psychology pediatrics, and other fields. As part of its mission, the American Academy Of Sleep Medicine (AASM) strives to increase awareness of sleep disorders in public and professional communities. The AASM is the major national organization in the field of sleep medicine. We represent several thousand clinicians and researchers in sleep disorders medicine.

The following guidelines can be used for a variety of sleep disorders. They will help most people sleep better. For more specific guidelines for your particular sleep problem, consult your healthcare professional.

  • Maintain a regular wake time, even on days off work and on weekends.
  • Try to go to bed only when you are drowsy.
  • If you are not drowsy and are unable to fall asleep for about 20 minutes, leave your bedroom and engage in a quiet activity elsewhere. Do not permit yourself to fall asleep outside the bedroom. Return to bed when, and only when, you are sleepy. Repeat this process as often as necessary throughout the night.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep, sex, and times of illness.
  • Establish relaxing pre-sleep rituals such as a warm bath, light bedtime snack or 10 minutes of reading.
  • Exercise regularly. Confine vigorous exercise to early hours, at least six hours before bedtime, and do mind exercises at least four hours prior to bedtime.
  • Keep a regular schedule. Regular times for meals, medications, chores, and other activities help keep the inner clock running smoothly.
  • While a light snack before bedtime can promote sound sleep, avoid large meals.
  • Avoid indigestion of caffeine within six hours of bedtime.
  • Do not drink alcohol when sleepy. Even a small dose of alcohol can have a potent effect when combined with tiredness.
  • Avoid the use of nicotine close to bedtime or during the night.
  • Sleeping pills should be used only conservatively. Most doctors avoid prescribing sleeping pills for periods longer than three weeks.
  • Do not drink alcohol while taking sleeping pills or other medications.

A good night’s sleep is within reach. If you suspect that you may have a sleep disorder, contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment.

How do I get better sleep?

Getting better sleep
We all know what it feels like to be “running on empty,” but most of us can shake it off after a few days. Where does that leave the ones that can’t? Tired and frustrated. We can help with that. These easy-to-apply tips can make a huge difference in your sleep, that can ultimately make an enormous difference in your life.

If  you’re having trouble sleeping, try these:

  • Mantain a regular wake time, even on days off work and on weekends.
  • Try to go to bed only when you are drowsy.
  • If you get in bed and are not drowsy, leave your bedroom and engage in quiet activity. Do not permit yourself to fall asleep outside of the bedroom.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep, sex and times of illness.
  • If you have trouble sleeping at night, don’t nap during the daytime. If you do nap, try to do so at the same time every day and for no more than one hour. Mid-afternoon (no later than 3:00 p.m.) is best for most people.
  • Establish relaxing pre-sleep rituals such as a warm bath, light bedtime snack or ten minutes of reading.
  • Exercise regularly. Confine vigorous exercise to early in the day, at least six hours before bedtime, and do mild exercise at least four hours before bedtime.
  • Keep a regular schedule. Regular times for meals, medications, chores and other activities help keep the brain’s inner clock running smoothly, allowing you to sleep more easily and soundly.
  • While a light snack before bedtime can help promote sound sleep, avoid large meals.
  • Avoid caffeine (coffee, tea, soda with caffeine, cocoa or chocolate) within six hours of bedtime.
  • Do not drink alcohol when sleepy. When you are sleepy, even a small dose of alcohol can affect activities like driving. Do not drink alcohol while taking sleeping pills or certain other medications (consult your healthcare professional). Do not use alcohol to help you sleep at night. While alcohol may help you to fall asleep more quickly, it severely affects the quality of sleep later in the night and may even keep you from sleeping through the night.
  • Avoid tobacco close to bedtime or during the night.
  • Sleeping pills should be used conservatively. Most healthcare professionals avoid prescribing sleeping pills for periods longer than two or three weeks. Remember to tell your healthcare professional about any symptoms of breathing problems during sleep (snoring, stop-breathing episodes, waking up short of breath, waking up with a headache or nausea) when being prescribed sleeping pills.

If these don’t help, take it a step further:

Distract your mind

Lying in bed frustrated because you cannot fall asleep, and trying harder and harder to fall asleep, will never help you sleep. If you have trouble sleeping, try distracting your mind by reading, watching a videotape (not television, because that gives you the time), listening to a book on tape, etc. For some people, it is good to do this in bed; other people find it different room better

Curtail Time in Bed

Most insomniacs stay in bed longer than they should. This makes sleep more shallow and riddled with awakenings. Many people find that consistently cutting of time spent in bed in bed helps them sleep more soundly and leads to a more refreshing sleep.

Managing Stress

The stress that stems from common life situations often contributes to sleep problems. A relaxing activity around bedtime can help relieve tension and encourage sleep. Taking some time to think clearly about your problems and propose a few solutions can have a positive effect on your sleep quality. Talking with a trusted friend or colleague to “air out” troubling issues also can be helpful. Relaxation exercise, meditation, biofeedback and hypnosis are sometimes good methods for controlling sleep problems. These techniques should be learned from a psychologist, physician or other healthcare professional.

Designating “Worry Time”

Another technique that can be helpful is to designate a particular time for worry. This time is dedicated to sorting out problems and coming up with possible solutions. Set aside 30 minutes in the evening to sit alone and undisturbed. Try writing down problems in a list. Write your more serious worries on 3×5 cards, where you write one worry as it comes to mind (one per card). When you have all of your worries written down, sort the cards into three to five piles, according to the priority of each worry. Next, look at each card and formulate a possible solution to that worry. While not all worries will have easy solutions, even small progress in remedying a worry can yield helpful results. The morning after recording your worries, review the worry cards and begin to work on resolving the worries you’ve identified.

 

If none of these help, or you have some of the previously mentioned breathing concerns, visit our website to learn more and to book an appointment with us.

 

Sleep is a precious resource. Make sure you get enough.

Sleep and Depression

Information provided by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Sleep Medicine - Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A.

Sleep Medicine – Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A.

Do you think depression may be causing you to have trouble sleeping at night?

Do you have trouble sleeping, or sleeping too much during the day? These problems may be caused by external factors (i.e. noise or light) or temporary stresses (i.e. new baby or starting a new job), it is important to understand that these troubles may also be connected to your mood. in some cases, these sleep problems may be related to a condition called depression.

Depression is one cause of sleep troubles, but there are many others.

Related: Sleep isn’t just “time out” from daily life

What is depression?

Depression is being recognized more and more as a condition that involves how we feel about ourselves and how we respond to events in our lives. Depression also affects our bodies. Trouble falling asleep and/or staying asleep are important features of depression. Other symptoms may include:

  • Down or low moods, feeling sad most of the day, nearly every day
  • Loss of interest or inability to experience pleasure in things that generally had been pleasurable before
  • Abrupt changes in weight, either significant weight loss or weight gain
  • Loss of energy
  • Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
  • Thoughts that life isn’t worth living, even to the point of actively considering ending one’s life
  • Anger outbursts, irritability, nervousness

If I don’t sleep well, does that mean I’m depressed?

Not necessarily. Depression is one case of sleep troubles, but there are many others. For example, sone people stop breathing over and over again during sleep, a condition referred to as Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). This problem can wake them often while sleeping, leading to daytime sleepiness. Lastly, it’s important to know that trouble sleeping for any reason can lead to feelings of depression. Age has an effect on how depression affects your sleep. For example, a younger adult with depression often has trouble falling asleep. People over 40 more often have trouble remaining asleep. Both can be caused by depression.

What happens when I am referred to the Sleep Center?

In many cases, the sleep disorders specialist will interview you. This provides a complete history of your sleep and related problems. You may also be asked to cpmlete a short (two-week) sleep diary of your sleep habits and difficulties. in addition, some specialists ask you to fill out a questionnaire. Taken together, this information can lead to a sleep or depression diagnosis.

Video Tour of the ADC Sleep Center

Contact Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic today to find out if a sleep study is right for you. No referral is necessary. 
6700 W. Ninth, Amarillo, Texas, 79106
(806) 356-5522 
Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday

The Science Behind Drowsiness

Written by The American Academy of Sleep Medicine
The ADC Sleep Disorder Center - Drowsiness

Your body requires three things: water, food and sleep. You can choose not to drink water or not to eat food until you eventually die. Your body’s need to sleep is so strong, however, that you can try not to sleep, but your brain will eventually make your body sleep, no matter what you are doing at the time.

VIDEO: (Inside Look) Sleep Medicine with Dr. Gary Polk

Several factors can cause drowsiness: body clock, exposure to daylight/darkness and how long you’ve been awake. Your body’s internal clock (called Circadian rhythm) signals you to be sleepy twice a day: first in the evening at bedtime, and again about 12 hours later, during the “siesta” time of the afternoon. The cycle of sunlight and darkness in a day also affects our bodies’ internal clocks. In addition, the length of time we stay awake can increase our need for sleep (i.e., the longer you stay awake, the more you need sleep).

Although each person’s sleep needs and patterns vary, most adults require an average of eight hours of restful sleep each night. If you are not getting enough sleep, the result is sleep debt. Your sleep debt continues to grow as you “add on” more and more hours of missed sleep time.

The longer you try to stay awake or the more nights you get poor or not enough sleep, the greater the effect on your mental and physical abilities.

Poor sleep quality, or not getting enough sleep, causes excessive sleepiness and reduces your alertness and performance. You react more slowly and have more trouble making decisions. You also have a difficult time paying attention, and your memory and coordination are weaker. In fact, people who are drowsy sometimes don’t realize that they have these symptoms, making drowsiness that much more dangerous.

The effects of drowsiness actually are just like the effects of drinking. In many states a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 is the legal limit for alcohol. A 1997 research study found that being awake for 18 hours produced impairment equal to a BAC of .05. After 24 hours of being awake, it jumps to .10. Even if you only lose one or two hours of sleep a night, drowsiness can impair your ability to drive at a rate that is higher than the legal alcohol limit.

The ADC Sleep Disorder Center - Drowsiness

This fact is even more disturbing when compared with the average amount of sleep that adults get every night. Sleep studies report that adults do not get the recommended eight hours of restful sleep at night. One study found 64% get less than eight hours and 32% report they get six hours or less. Whether you are severely drowsy only once in your lifetime, or you’re sleepy all the time, the consequences can be fatal.

The ADC Sleep Disorders Center

Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic Sleep Disorders Center opened in 1999 for the diagnoses and treatment of patients who have difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep at night, problems with excessive daytime sleepiness or other medical problems that may occur or exacerbate during sleep.

Sleep Disorders

We are the only comprehensive clinic which offers our patients evaluations and follow-up consultations with board certified physicians in:
• Internal Medicine
• Pulmonary Diseases
• Sleep Medicine

Sleep isn’t just “time out” from daily life

Written by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

bedroom

Sleep isn’t just “time out” from daily life. It is an active state important for renewing our mental and physical health each day. More than 100 million Americans of all ages, however, regularly fail to get a good night’s sleep.

At least 84 disorders of sleeping and waking lead to a lowered quality of life and reduced personal health. They endanger public safety by contributing to traffic and industrial accidents. These disorders can lead to problems falling asleep and staying asleep, difficulties staying awake or staying with a regular sleep/wake cycle, sleepwalking, bedwetting, nightmares and other problems that interfere with sleep. Some sleep disorders can be life-threatening.

Sleep disorders are diagnosed and treated by many different healthcare professionals, including general practitioners and specialists in neurology, pulmonary medicine, psychiatry, psychology, pediatrics, and other fields. As part of its mission, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) strives to increase awareness of sleep disorders in public and professional communities. The AASM is the major national organization in the field of sleep medicine. We represent several thousand clinicians and researchers in sleep disorders medicine.

Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic Sleep Disorders Center opened in 1999 for the diagnoses and treatment of patients who have difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep at night, problems with excessive daytime sleepiness or other medical problems that may occur or exacerbate during sleep.

Sleep Disorders

We are the only comprehensive clinic which offers our patients evaluations and follow-up consultations with board certified physicians in:

  • Internal Medicine

  • Pulmonary Diseases

  • Sleep Medicine