Snoring Solutions to Help You Get Better Sleep

Snoring is a common symptom that acts as an alert of sleep apnea. When snoring and sleepiness co-exist, the likelihood of sleep apnea must be considered. Snoring can be problematic, not only for the person snoring but also for anyone nearby.

Diagnosis & Treatment

People who snore make a vibrating, rattling, noisy sound while breathing during sleep. It may be a symptom of sleep apnea. A few other signs might be:

  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Morning headaches
  • Recent weight gain
  • Awakening in the morning not feeling rested
  • Awaking at night feeling confused
  • Change in your level of attention, concentration, or memory
  • Observed pauses in breathing during sleep

Simple, non-invasive testing can be performed to accurately diagnose many leading conditions that may cause snoring or excessive sleepiness. If treatment is necessary, it can be accomplished through a second-night study. In many cases, patients will become more alert and productive the very next day, no surgery or medications required. These conditions can be very quickly corrected, resulting in an improved quality of life, as well as decreasing cardiovascular risks for heart attacks, strokes, and heart irregularities.

Sleep Tips

The good news is that diagnosing and treating these ailments is nothing to lose sleep over. Developing healthy sleep habits will encourage a decrease or elimination in symptoms. Give these a try:

  • Avoid caffeine for six hours before bedtime
  • Avoid alcohol for two hours before bedtime
  • Avoid smoking cigarettes
  • Exercise, but not within 2 hours of bedtime
  • Maintain a regular sleep/wake cycle

Don’t stay in the dark about healthy sleep. Visit the Sleep Center at ADC. Other disorders can also disturb your sleep. They may include periodic movements in sleep, restless legs syndrome, nightmares, panic attacks, sleep walking, sleep talking and many others. Contact Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic to schedule an appointment.

Additional information about sleep disorders can be obtained from the American Sleep Disorders Association or by scheduling an appointment for a consultation with a sleep specialist.

Snoring: What is your body telling you?

Frustrated man and sleeping woman

Frustrated man and sleeping woman

A lack of quality sleep can manifest itself in many ways. Excessive sleepiness, for example, may be due to sleep-deprivation or may be a sign of a sleep disorder.  Sleep Apnea is often to blame. Sleep apnea is a cessation of breath during sleep, and usually occurs from a blockage in the back of the throat.

Did you know snoring may be a symptom of a serious, potentially life-threatening, condition called sleep apnea. The good news is, for most people both snoring and sleep apnea can be eliminated in one day.

The problem is much more common than many realize. In fact, approximately 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, narcolepsy or insomnia. An additional 20-30 million individuals experience intermittent sleep related problems.

Snoring is a common symptom that acts as an alert of sleep apnea. When snoring and sleepiness co-exist, the likelihood of sleep apnea must be considered. Snoring can be problematic, not only for the person snoring, but also for anyone nearby.

Diagnosis & Treatment

Simple, non-invasive testing can be performed to accurately diagnose many leading conditions that may cause snoring or excessive sleepiness. If treatment is necessary, it can be accomplished through a second night study. In many cases, patients will become more alert and productive the very next day, no surgery or medications required. These conditions can be very quickly corrected, resulting in an improved quality of life, as well as decreasing cardiovascular risks for heart attacks, strokes and heart irregularities.

Sleep Hygiene

The good news is that diagnosing and treating these ailments is nothing to lose sleep over. Developing healthy sleep habits will encourage a decrease or elimination in symptoms. Give these a try:

  • Avoid caffeine for six hours before bedtime
  • Avoid alcohol for two hours before bedtime
  • Avoid smoking cigarettes
  • Exercise, but not within 2 hours of bedtime
  • Maintain a regular sleep/wake cycle

Don’t stay in the dark about healthy sleep. Visit the Sleep Center at ADC. Other disorders can also disturb your sleep. They may include periodic movements in sleep, restless legs syndrome, nightmares, panic attacks, sleep walking, sleep talking and many others. Contact Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic to schedule an appointment..

Additional information about sleep disorders can be obtained from the American Sleep Disorders Association or by scheduling an appointment for a consultation with a sleep specialist.

ADC Sleep Disorders Center

ADC Sleep Disorders Center

 

Snoring?

We Can’t Get Away From It, Right? Wrong!

Snoring is one of those problems that affects women directly (if they snore) or indirectly (if their partner snores). The bad news is, snoring may be a symptom of a serious, potentially life-threatening, condition called sleep apnea. The good news is, for most people both snoring and sleep apnea can be eliminated in one day.

Approximately 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, narcolepsy or insomnia. An additional 20-30 million individuals experience intermittent sleep related problems.

Excessive sleepiness may be due to sleep-deprivation or may be a sign of a sleep disorder, the most dangerous of which is sleep apnea. Sleep apnea means cessation of breathing during sleep and usually occurs from a blockage in the back of the throat. Snoring is the most common symptom that warns of sleep apnea. When snoring and sleepiness co-exist, the likelihood of sleep apnea must be considered. In some cases, the sleepiness can be life-threatening, particularly for people who drive a motor vehicle or operate equipment that may be dangerous.

Simple non-invasive testing can be performed to accurately diagnose most of the conditions that cause snoring or excessive sleepiness. If treatment is necessary it can be accomplished through a second night study. In most cases, you will become more alert and productive the very next day without surgery or medications. These conditions can be very quickly corrected, resulting in an improved quality of life as well as decreasing cardiovascular risks for heart attacks, strokes and irregular heartbeats.

In an attempt to keep pace in today’s society, women are often plagued with numerous stressors in their life. Balancing home and family responsibilities along with a professional life may cause sleep deprivation, anxiety or even depression. A common symptom that can be brought on by this stress is insomnia.

Developing good sleep habits can often decrease or eliminate symptoms of insomnia. These include avoiding caffeine for six hours before bedtime and avoiding alcohol and smoking for one to two hours before bedtime. Exercise can be very helpful but not too close to bedtime. It is also important to maintain a regular sleep/wake cycle. By awakening every day at the same time and going to bed around the same time each day, your internal clock is able to be regulated and work with you.

Other disorders can also disturb your sleep. They may include periodic movements in sleep, restless legs syndrome, nightmares, panic attacks, sleep walking, sleep talking and many others.

The good news is that diagnosing and treating these ailments is nothing to lose sleep over.

Additional information about sleep disorders can be obtained from the American Sleep Disorders Association or by scheduling an appointment for a consultation with a sleep specialist.

ADC Sleep Disorders Center

ADC Sleep Disorders Center

Visit the Sleep Center at ADC

A Hidden Crisis: Driver Sleep Apnea

Originally Published on PPD

What is Sleep ApneaSleep apnea is very common, particularly in the commercial driver population. Studies show that up to 28% of commercial drivers may be afflicted. Primary risk factors include being male, overweight, and over the age of forty. Fortunately, sleep apnea can be diagnosed and, with treatment, quality of life and health benefits can be realized.

Also See: U.S. Department of Transportation: Sleep Apnea and Commercial Drivers

Sleep apnea is defined as the cessation of breathing during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep apnea – where the tissues in the back of the throat repetitively collapse during sleep, producing snoring and complete airway blockage. This blockage creates pauses in breathing that occur repeatedly every night. In severe cases they can occur as frequently as every 30 seconds. Alarmingly, they can last up to a full minute.

These repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep are accompanied by a reduction in blood oxygen levels and are followed by an arousal response. This response includes a release of substances into the bloodstream, which promote elevation of blood pressure, inflammation, insulin resistance, and a disruption of the brain wave sleep pattern. The consequences of untreated sleep apnea include poor quality sleep, excessive daytime fatigue and sleepiness, irritability, hard-to-control high blood pressure and diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Interestingly, and not coincidentally, many of these same medical conditions account for the majority of health-related expenditures in the commercial driver population. Moreover, untreated sleep apnea may be responsible for job impairment and motor vehicle crashes.