Traveling Overseas? Don’t Forget Your Vaccinations.

ADC - traveling

Whether traveling for business or pleasure, most people do not think about the possibility of acquiring a travel-related illness. In fact, travel in undeveloped countries and many foreign or tropical countries outside of resort areas, does entail some risks for acquiring local or travel-related diseases. The Travel Clinic at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic is available to assist you with problems in this regard. We have a full-service clinic with disease-prevention strategies, information, vaccinations and medications available for travel essentially anywhere in the world. The travel clinic at ADC is supervised by Dr. Taylor Carlisle, a board certified Infection Disease specialist trained in Tropical Medicine and Public Health.

If you are planning to take your family overseas for a vacation, or maybe you’re going on a mission trip with your church, Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic encourages you to take precautions prior to your trip. Our travel clinic not only provides immunizations, but also provides pre-travel counseling and post-travel health evaluations. It is recommended that you see your physician 6 to 8 weeks prior to your departure and then again; after your trip if you experience unusual health issues. Remember, it is easier to take precautions in preventing overseas illnesses than it is to treat them. Call Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic today and let our travel clinic staff assist you in planning for a healthy overseas adventure.

Vaccinations

  • You should get vaccinated against any diseases that may be endemic to the region where you’re headed at least four weeks before a trip out of the country.
  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site to learn more about diseases you may come in contact with during your trip.

People are basically the same no matter where you travel.
But the diseases and illnesses can be very different.

The bacteria and germs that live in one country can be very different from those of another region. That’s why lots of people get sick when they travel – they don’t have natural immunity to these germs (or put another way, their bodies haven’t yet learned how to defend themselves against these new, potentially health-threatening invaders). A common example of this is ” traveler’s diarrhea,” which often occur when visitors drink tap water while away. Ever notice how the locals don’t suffer from this malady? That’s because they have natural immunity to the bacteria that are present in their water and you don’t.

You should ask your healthcare provider if you think you will need vaccinations before traveling. Contact us to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. 

 

 

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Enjoying Paradise – Tips to Avoid Travel Illness

Summer is finally here! As you plan your exotic vacation, the excitement of what lies ahead begins to really grow. But, have you asked yourself the question, “what if, among the once-in-a-lifetime paradise I am visiting, I do something to leave me stuck inside my hotel room sick?” Let us offer you some tips to keep you in tip-top shape while you’re in paradise.

Because really, wouldn’t you rather be enjoying this:

Palm Beach

Instead of this:

Sick in a Hotel

Vaccinations

  • You should get vaccinated against any diseases that may be endemic to the region where you’re headed at least four weeks before a trip out of the country.
  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site to learn more about diseases you may come in contact with during your trip.

To Reduce Contamination in your Food and Water

In countries with poor sanitation:

  • Don’t drink tap water or use it to brush your teeth. Use filtered or bottled water instead.
  • Ice in your drinks could spell disaster, so avoid it altogether. Bottled drinks with a seal are usually safe, and so are boiled water and hot drinks made with boiled water.
  • If food has been kept at room temperature in warm locations, it could have been exposed to flies. Try only eating food that is served hot.
  • Don’t eat salads, uncooked fruits and vegetables unless you’ve washed and peeled them yourself.

Staying away from Bug Bites

  • If you are visiting an area where mosquitos are common, sleep under a mosquito net to avoid being bitten at night. Extra tip: Carry a small sewing kit with you to repair any holes.
  • Malaria mosquitoes bite between dusk and dawn, so being indoors during these hours can reduce the number of bites.
  • Using products with DEET are the most effective insect repellents, but be sure to read the directions for their proper use.
  • Avoid tight clothing, which mosquitos can bite through. Wear loose-fitting clothing in malaria hotspots.

Don’t let Jet Lag Ruin your Vacation/Treat it Early

  • Jet Lag can throw your biological clock with weakens your immune system. Try adjusting to your new schedule at least a week before you travel, if possible. Go to sleep and wake up earlier/later depending on which direction you’re heading.
  • Don’t try to cure jetlag with caffeine or alcohol. This will give you an inefficient amount of sleep and possibly make conditions worse.

Follow these tips, and plan for your safety on upcoming trips. Proper planning will allow you to make the most of your vacation and come back with great stories to tell your friends and family.

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If you are traveling out the country, set up a consultation with our travel medicine specialist, J. Taylor Carlisle, M.D. at 358-0200