Osteoporosis and Women: How to Prevent Weak Bones

Osteoporosis is a medical condition in which the bones become brittle and fragile from loss of tissue, typically as a result of hormonal changes, or deficiency of calcium or vitamin D. Osteoporosis develops gradually, usually without symptoms. A broken bone that occurs with minor trauma, such as a slight blow to the wrist, for example, is typically the first symptom. Approximately one in two women and one in four men over age 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their remaining lifetime.

Bone Density Testing

If you are age 65 or older, you should get a bone density test to screen for osteoporosis. If you are younger than 65 and have risk factors for osteoporosis, ask your doctor or nurse if you need a bone density test before age 65. Bone density testing is recommended for older women whose risk of breaking a bone is the same or greater than that of a 65‑year‑old white woman with no risk factors other than age. 

A bone mineral density (BMD) test measures the strength of your bones to help assess your future risk of fractures. This test is not usually performed until after menopause unless you have an unusual clinical situation or are at high risk for osteoporosis. It is quick, painless and noninvasive.

Preventing Weak Bones

The best way to prevent weak bones is to work on building strong ones. No matter how old you are, it is never too late to start. Building strong bones during childhood and the teen years is one of the best ways to keep from getting osteoporosis later. As you get older, your bones don’t make new bone fast enough to keep up with the bone loss. And after menopause, bone loss happens more quickly.

But there are steps you can take to slow the natural bone loss with aging and to prevent your bones from becoming weak and brittle. There are five simple steps to reduce your risk for osteoporosis:

  • Increase the amount of calcium and vitamin D in your diet.
  • Exercise regularly; bones and muscles respond to physical activity by becoming stronger. Weight-bearing exercises like walking and weight lifting are the most beneficial.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight. Being underweight or losing weight increases your risk of bone loss and fracture, and ultimately, of developing osteoporosis.
  • Quit smoking. Cigarette smoking (nicotine) can reduce bone mass and increase the risk of fracture, thus increasing your risk for osteoporosis. Ask your health care professional to recommend methods to help you quit.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation, if you drink. Excessive consumption of alcohol increases your risk of osteoporosis and fractures from falls.

For some women, medication may also be helpful for preventing additional bone loss. Ask your health care professional what the best osteoporosis prevention strategy is for you.

Finally…

The importance of beginning bone loss prevention at a very young age is now well understood. Bone health programs are being developed and implemented that targets girls as young as nine to 12 years of age and their parents, focusing on promoting good nutritional choices and participating in regular physical activity. Contact us if you have any questions or to schedule an appointment.

(Some information provided by Healthywomen.org)

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To All The Ladies: Your Unique Healthcare

adc-womens-health-her-care

Some information provided by the National Institute of Health.

Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic offers health services that exclusively focuses on women and their life transitions. ADC offers gender-specific medicine simply because women and men experience health and disease differently. HerCare offers a variety of different Woman’s health solutions including:

  • Sexual health including sexual dysfunction
  • Preoperative risk assessment
  • Cardiovascular risk profile and prevention
  • Midlife hormone management therapy
  • Osteoporosis and treatments including Bisphosphonate alternatives
  • Vulvar diseases
  • Well-woman exams

Gender Specific Science

It’s no secret that there are vast differences in reproductive health between men and women, however, there are also several other ways that men’s health differs from women’s. For example, men and women both experience different symptoms for the same medical problem. Men are also at higher risk of developing certain conditions, such as toxic occupational exposure, and women are at higher risk of developing others, such as osteoporosis, or thinning bones. Because there are differences in men’s and women’s health, different approaches are sometimes taken to prevent and treat various health conditions.

Women’s Health

Did you know that studies have shown that women live longer than men? Women live an average of 5 years longer, but they tend to be “sicker” than men. Despite a longer lifespan, there are conditions that might affect women primarily or more severely than men. For example, almost 12% of women in the United States are at risk for developing breast cancer during their lifetime. Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of existing breast cancer cases. Certain health issues and their different effects on women are listed below:

  • Alcohol abuse: While men are more likely to become dependent on, or addicted to, alcohol than women are throughout their lifetime, the health effects of alcohol abuse and alcoholism (when someone shows signs of addiction to alcohol) are more serious in women.
  • Heart disease: Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. Although heart disease is also the leading cause of death for men in the United States, women are more likely to die following a heart attack than men are.
  • Mental health: Women are more likely to show signs of depression and anxiety than men are.
  • Osteoarthritis: Arthritis is the leading cause of physical disability in the United States. The condition affects almost 27 million people, and affects more women than men.
  • Reproductive health: Women are able to carry and deliver babies.
  • Urinary tract health: Women are more likely than men are to experience urinary tract problems. For example, urinary incontinence affects twice as many women as men due to the way the female urinary tract is structured.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases: The effect of STDs/STIs on women can be more serious than on men. Untreated STDs/STIs cause infertility in at least 24,000 women each year in the United States.
  • Stress: According to a recent survey by the American Psychological Association, stress is on the rise for women. Women are more likely to report having stress, and almost 50% of all women in the survey, compared to 39% of the men, reported that their stress had increased over the past 5 years.
  • Stroke: More women than men suffer a stroke each year.

Women and men experience health and disease differently, which is why “Her Care” matters. Take control of your health today! Contact us if you have any questions or to set up an appointment.

Updated – Free Lecture “Hormone Cookbook” Feat. Dr. Joanna Wilson

Jan 2014

What: FREE LECTURE

When: Friday, January 10, 4:00 – 4:45 p.m.

Where: Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, Lobby, Building B

Topic: Hormones and Women’s Health

This Friday: “Gut Instinct” Event (Feat. Dr. Joanna Wilson)

Gut Instinct Lecture (HerCare)

Gut Instinct Lecture (HerCare)

New Pap Smear Guidelines (Feat. Dr. Joanna Wilson)

Interview Dr. Joanna Wilson, ADC | KFDA, News Channel 10, Amarillo

Interview Dr. Joanna Wilson, ADC | KFDA, News Channel 10, Amarillo

Joanna Wilson, D. O. Internal Medicine specializing in Women's Health

Joanna Wilson, D. O.
Internal Medicine specializing in Women’s Health

Annual exams are now not really annual. The recommendations for Pap Smears have changed.

It’s recommended now that Pap Smear screening should start at age 21 and for most women, they can stop screening at age 65.

The reason for this is because the quality of Pap Smear screening has improved so much. No longer are we taking samples and smearing them on a slide to examine them. Now, they can take all the cells and examine them thoroughly with more sensitivity. Therefore, we can know that exams don’t have to be annual since the samples are quality. The samples are much better quality now then they once were.

The ability to reduce screening while increasing sensitivity is a unique thing in this day and age. It means you don’t have to be anxious about getting a Pap Smear once a year. For people who aren’t comfortable skipping their annual exam, by all means go to the annual exam to learn the other things you need such as blood pressure, weight and other things.

But the quality of the samples are so good now, and since we know so much more about the human papillomavirus – how it changes the cells an  what the timeline is  – we can, with very good science, say that screening every 3 years without the HPV add-on, or we can screen every 5 years with that test. We’re in good hands.

To learn more, visit http://www.ADPCA.com

Video: Women are 4x More Likely To Develop Osteoporosis

Did you know that women are four times more likely to develop Osteoporosis than men? If you have noticed a loss in height, or have a history of Osteoporosis, schedule an appointment with a Rheumatologist at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, the simple solution to your healthcare needs.

Click on the images to learn more about ADC’s Rheumatology Specialists

Dr. Ming Chen, Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic, P.A. Specialist, Rheumatology

Ming Chen, M.D., Ph.D

What is Rheumatology?

Rheumatology is a sub-specialty in internal medicine, devoted to diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases.

Learn more about this one of a kind specialty at Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic.

“Let’s Talk Menopause” Free Lecture – October 26

Call Mary at 356-5520 to RSVP – Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic Free Lecture