Healthy Aging: 10 Benefits of Staying Active in Your Senior Years

Physical activity or exercise has countless benefits, even for seniors. Fitting in regular exercise into day-to-day life routine can have immediate and long-term health benefits. Most importantly, regular activity can improve your quality of life.

Why Should Seniors Workout?

  1. Arthritis: Exercise is one of the most crucial options for arthritis management. Regular activity helps lubricate the joints and can help reduce overall pain and stiffness that is often present among individuals with arthritis. Moreover, obesity is a risk factor for the disease, and increasing physical activity levels can help better manage the debilitating symptoms of arthritis.
  2. Heart disease: Heart disease is one of the biggest causes of death in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that about one in every four deaths is attributed to heart disease. More people exercising later in life can help reduce the number of individuals with heart disease through the management of blood pressure and blood glucose and decreasing LDL cholesterol.
  3. Metabolic Dysfunction (type II diabetes and obesity): Type II diabetes and obesity are two closely related diseases in which the body is in metabolic dysfunction. Exercise can help maintain proper body weight and help regulate blood glucose and insulin levels to make the body more efficient.
  4. Cancer: Exercise has been shown to help improve overall cancer risk among a variety of different forms of cancer. Studies have shown a 30 to 40 percent reduction in breast cancer risk among women who perform moderate to regular exercise.
  5. Hypertension: Exercise can help lower systolic blood pressure significantly through moderate-intensity physical activity. Try breaking up exercise into three bouts throughout the day lasting for at least 10 minutes each to receive blood pressure–lowering effects.
  6. Depression: Exercise can have a beneficial effect on personal mood. Studies suggest that group exercise classes among older adults can help reduce symptoms of depression by 30 percent or more in exercising older adults. The modest improvement in depressive symptoms can help maintain an overall greater vitality later in life and help prevent negative feelings or thoughts that are common with aging.
  7. Dementia: Dementia is a disabling condition affecting many older adults. With a wide range of mental disorders categorized as dementia, there is a great need to understand how to prevent the condition. Exercise is one prevention strategy that can help slow the mental decline. A recent study showed a 37 percent reduced risk and a 66 percent reduction in risk of dementia when older adults performed the moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting every adult ought to exercise to help lower the risk of mental decline and to help prevent mental disability later in life.
  8. Quality of life: Maintaining functional independence is something many older adults want. A regular exercise inclusive of strength and balance training can help accomplish this. Aim to be physically active for 30 minutes every day and to strength train at least two non-consecutive days per week.
  9. Insomnia: Certain medications and life events can prevent the body from proper sleep. Higher levels of physical activity can help exhaust the body enough to place it in a position for restful and lasting sleep. Avoid strenuous exercise two hours before bed to obtain these benefits, and aim to meet the daily activity recommendations.
  10. All-cause mortality: Exercise is known to reduce death from all causes. In fact, a recent study showed a 30 to 80 percent reduction in all-cause mortality when individuals exercised at an intensity level greater than 4 METS, suggesting that exercise can help delay premature death from various causes.

Finally…

If you are elderly, we recommend that you get medical clearance from your doctor before starting an exercise program to find out if there are any activities you should avoid. Call 806-358-0200, If you would like to schedule a visit with a physician here at the Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic.

(Some information provided by NIFS).

Get Up. Get Out. Don’t Sit. (NY Times Health)

From the New York Times

Just as we were all settling in front of the television to watch the baseball playoffs, two new studies about the perils of sitting have spoiled our viewing pleasure.

The research, published in separate medical journals this month, adds to a growing scientific consensus that the more time someone spends sitting, especially in front of the television, the shorter and less robust his or her life may be.

To reach that conclusion, the authors of one of the studies, published in the October issue of The British Journal of Sports Medicine, turned to data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study, a large, continuing survey of the health habits of almost 12,000 Australian adults.

READ MORE

Seniors, “Get Moving…Start Improving!”

This week we celebrated Senior Health & Fitness Day to promote the benefits of exercise for seniors. The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. As your body becomes older and weaker, and as your metabolism slows down, it’s important to keep active and moving. The rewards of physical activity are clear: higher metabolism, better blood pressure and heart health, increased bone density, and the list goes on.

Seniors Swimming

5 Myths about Exercise and Older Adults

From HelpGuide.Org

Myth 1: There’s no point to exercising. I’m going to get old anyway.

Fact: Exercise and strength training helps you look and feel younger and stay active longer. Regular physical activity lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, high blood pressure, and obesity.

Myth 2: Elderly people shouldn’t exercise. They should save their strength and rest.

Fact: Research shows that a sedentary lifestyle is unhealthy for the elderly. Period. Inactivity often causes seniors to lose the ability to do things on their own and can lead to more hospitalizations, doctor visits, and use of medicines for illnesses.

Myth 3: Exercise puts me at risk of falling down.

Fact: Regular exercise, by building strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, actually reducing your risk of falling.

Myth 4: It’s too late. I’m already too old to start exercising

Fact: You’re never too old to exercise! If you’ve never exercised before, or it’s been a while, start with light walking and other gentle activities.

Myth 5: I’m disabled. I can’t exercise sitting down.

Fact: Chair-bound people face special challenges but can lift light weights, stretch, and do chair aerobics to increase range of motion, improve muscle tone, and promote cardiovascular health.

Click here to read more on the benefits of elderly fitness…
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If you are elderly, we recommend that you get medical clearance from your doctor before starting an exercise program to find out if there are any activities you should avoid. Call 806.358.0200, If you would like to schedule a visit with a physician here at the Amarillo Diagnostic Clinic.

New Study: Workouts Help Sleep Quality

Diet and exercise are the best cure for most sleep disorders

Diet and exercise will always be the best diagnosis a doctor can give you. Often, it’s the simple things that can help reduce your risk of Sleep Apnea, an increasingly common form of sleep deprivation that affects millions of Americans. Come visit the Clinic’s Sleep Center for more information regarding Sleep Apnea. Our world class medical staff has been helping victims of Sleep Apnea for decades.
Visit the Sleep Center website.
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People who regularly hit the gym sleep better and feel more alert during the day than those who are not as physically active, according to a new study.

The results showed that people who did 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week reported a 65-percent improvement in sleep quality.

“Physical activity may not just be good for the waistline and heart, but it also can help you sleep,” study researcher Brad Cardinal, professor of exercise science at Oregon State University, said in a statement.

Participants who worked out for at least 150 minutes also said that they felt less drowsy during the daytime, compared with those who were less physically active.

(People who got 150 minutes of exercise a week reported a 65-percent improvement in their sleep quality.)

Cardinal and his colleagues studied a nationally representative sample of more than 2,600 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85.

They study adds to the evidence showing that “regular physical activity may serve as a non-pharmaceutical alternative to improve sleep,” Cardinal said.

The study showed that the risk of often feeling overly sleepy during the day dropped by 65 percent for the more active participants.

The study authors noted that the national guideline that recommends getting 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week was originally set to improve cardiovascular health, but their findings show that that level of exercise has other health benefits as well. Approximately 35 percent to 40 percent of adults in the U.S. have problems falling asleep or experience daytime sleepiness, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Too tired to workout?

The researchers also found that participants who met the physical activity guidelines were 68 percent less likely to experience leg cramps while sleeping, and 45 percent less likely to have difficulty concentrating when tired.

If you often experience daytime drowsiness, it may seem contradictory to spend even more of your lagging energy by going for a run or attending a Zumba class, but such physical exertion will actually make you feel more awake, according to the researchers.
“There are trade-offs. It may be easier when you are tired to skip the workout and go to sleep, but it may be beneficial for your long-term health to make the hard decision and get your exercise,” Cardinal said.

The study will be published in the December issue of the journal Mental Health and Physical Activity.

Pass it on: People who get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week sleep better and feel more alert during the day than those that are not as physically active.